Women Walk

water shortage, women, water carriers

Every day women around the world spend 200 mil­lion hours col­lect­ing water for their fam­i­lies. While they walk, pri­vate own­er­ship of water, exces­sive use of water for vast mono-cul­tur­al agribusi­ness­es, deforestation/desertification prac­tices, and cli­mate change go unchecked, cre­at­ing and wors­en­ing this sit­u­a­tion. Their paths are not roman­tic, safe or easy. They can walk for hours then trip, fall and lose their days work. Their backs, inter­nal organs break down from the inces­sant, cum­ber­some weights they car­ry, some­times three times/day at all hours. Sure­ly, this is some­thing that must be attend­ed to.

Frack=Earthquakes

FrackEarthquake copy

Mess around with the bones of the earth and there is liable to be trou­ble. Earth­quakes are appear­ing in new, star­tling places like Ohio, Okla­homa, Texas, Nether­lands, not known for earth­quakes but sites for frack­ing.  It’s mad­ness. Check out  Like Thun­der in the Ground, (Tom Dart, The Guardian, 1/5/18) to find about frack­ing and earth­quakes in north Texas and what an envi­ron­men­tal group, Live­able Arling­ton, is doing in response.

Earth Not War 2

earth, ecology, environment, climate change, department of defense, war, pollution, ecocide

Here’s anoth­er poster protest­ing the U.S. military’s role in pol­lut­ing the earth. The Depart­ment of “Defense” pro­duces more haz­ardous waste than the five largest U.S. oil com­pa­nies com­bined! At the same time, the Pen­ta­gon is exempt from all inter­na­tion­al cli­mate agree­ments!!! How can this be? For anoth­er arti­cle on this issue, check out Project Censored’s US Depart­ment of Defense is the Worst Pol­luter on the Plan­et.

Earth Not War

environment, sustainability,ecology, anti-war,

When we think about envi­ron­men­tal destruc­tion, we must think about war because mod­ern war­fare (most par­tic­u­lar­ly com­ing from our own mil­i­tary) is the num­ber one ene­my of the earth. Eco­cide — the destruc­tion of the nat­ur­al envi­ron­ment, espe­cial­ly when delib­er­ate — is both a strat­e­gy (i.e., Agent orange) and a con­se­quence of our mil­i­tary prac­tices (i.e., oil use) of U.S. wars. So, we fool our­selves if we think we can address cli­mate change and the envi­ron­ment with­out being anti-war. If you would like to check an arti­cle on this top­ic, read Karl Mathieson’s What is the Impact of Mod­ern War­fare in the 11/06/2014 issue of The Guardian.

Glistening Brooks

 

water scarcity, water rights, water democracy

When I was a kid, my friends and I could hop on our bikes, ped­al a mile or so and cup our hands to fetch and drink deli­cious, clean, ice-cold, fresh spring water. We knew the water was safe and nev­er dreamed that it would dis­ap­pear or that oth­ers could not have what we did. When I hear of the phe­nom­e­nal num­bers of peo­ple in the world with­out access to clean water, I am stunned. When I find myself not trust­ing the water flow­ing out of my tap or hear about impend­ing and already occur­ring scarci­ty, I am stunned. Water and humans go togeth­er. There should be no assign­ing of priv­i­lege with access to this basic ele­men­tal right. Nor should there be cor­po­rate prac­tices that hoard, mis­use, or defile our water. If you’d like some facts on water, check out this Unit­ed Nations fact sheet. Stag­ger­ing.

Fracking

FrackingOnceFarms

I was moved to design this poster on frack­ing after watch­ing the doc­u­men­tary, “Gasland,” writ­ten and direct­ed by Josh Fox. Lis­ten­ing to the peo­ple whose lives have been imme­di­ate­ly affect­ed by frack­ing on or near their prop­er­ty is an eye-open­er and a call to action.  While frack­ing occurs or may begin in many dif­fer­ent envi­rons, includ­ing in my city, I used the red barn in this image because of the threat to my beau­ti­ful beloved home state of New York. I warm­ly remem­ber count­less rides with my grand­par­ents through the lus­cious coun­try­side, being taught to love nature, to hon­or our farm­lands, to val­ue those dis­tinc­tive red barns. Those kinds of places are now suf­fer­ing from or being threat­ened by  envi­ron­men­tal destruc­tion due to frack­ing.

Commune (The Verb)

It is easy when doing polit­i­cal posters to focus on our trou­bles. There are many, after all. Some­times, how­ev­er, I nudge myself to con­cen­trate on our vision of a bet­ter life, to remind myself why I got involved in move­ments in the first place. The pow­er and joy of deep con­nec­tion with earth, the nat­ur­al world, with oth­er human beings. The impor­tance of cre­at­ing eco­nom­ic sys­tems and social insti­tu­tions that hon­or and sup­port those con­nec­tions. Doing this poster brought me back to those first excit­ing, very con­nect­ed days way back when.… Sigh.

Choose Your Long Haul

LongHaulChoseWeb

But­ter­flies grace us with their pres­ence as they alight quick­ly, ten­ta­tive­ly on blades of grass, a quick kiss on their long dis­tance jour­neys.  We watch, trans­fixed and delight­ed. They make our days a lit­tle more spe­cial, beau­ti­ful.  And, yet, they are dying in stag­ger­ing num­bers, vic­tim to an econ­o­my which digs up, paves over, pol­lutes and just gen­er­al­ly mess­es up the frag­ile paths our winged friends trav­el. Do we real­ly need this kind of econ­o­my, rep­re­sent­ed here by our mechan­i­cal, more destruc­tive long haulers?