Which is the Crime?

Hun­dreds of thou­sands of immi­grants are being kept (and forced to work) in immi­grant deten­tion cen­ters for cross­ing a bor­der every year. Along with the nec­es­sary ques­tion of Who Ben­e­fits? (large­ly pri­vate cor­po­ra­tions), this rais­es oth­er ques­tions: Which is the crime? Cross­ing a bor­der? Or keep­ing immi­grants cap­tive for mon­ey? This is not new in the age of Trump. Oba­ma (who deport­ed more peo­ple than all oth­er pres­i­dents of the cen­tu­ry before him, com­bined) detained large num­bers of fam­i­lies in prison set­ting the stage for Trump’s poli­cies today. For more on this stage set­ting, check out Cru­el and immoral: Amer­i­ca must close the doors of its immi­gra­tion pris­ons by C.C. Gar­cia Her­nan­dez, https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/jun/17/family-separation-family-detention-immigration. If you would like to see stats on immi­grants in deten­tion cen­ters check out Free­dom for Immi­grants site: https://www.freedomforimmigrants.org/detention-statistics/

 

Schools or Prisons?

schools, education, prisons, school-prison pipeline, racism, class

Today, I heard anoth­er instance of there being “not enough mon­ey”  to appro­pri­ate­ly fund a pre­dom­i­nate­ly Black and Lati­no high school’s course offer­ings. This time the school is Jef­fer­son High in Los Ange­les. Stu­dents will not get the cours­es they need to grad­u­ate on time. Stu­dents will have to repeat class­es they have already passed. Where do they turn? What does that slick say­ing “When one door clos­es, anoth­er one opens” mean for young peo­ple in this school? What options are we giv­ing our pre­cious youth when “not enough mon­ey” is seen as a good enough rea­son to block vital oppor­tu­ni­ties for some, when there is plen­ty of mon­ey avail­able for war, pris­ons, and yachts? Is this democ­ra­cy? Justice?

Schools Not Prisons

school prison pipeline, racism in education, prison industrial complex

It’s mind-bog­gling that a soci­ety pro­fess­ing moral demo­c­ra­t­ic supe­ri­or­i­ty around the world would stand by as Black and Lati­no chil­dren get pushed out of schools into what very like­ly will be an incar­cer­at­ed future. And yet, that is what is hap­pen­ing here and now. If you would like to know about the school to prison pipeline check out ACLU’s source page.

To LIve Simply

immigration,prison, detention, economic oppression, economy, workers,immigrants,false imprisonment

 

We are a soci­ety of false impris­on­ment. Human beings search­ing for ways to live safe­ly, con­tent­ed­ly with their peo­ple  being locked up in bad jobs, no jobs, deten­tion cen­ters, pris­ons, forced mil­i­tary ser­vice and despair. What kind of soci­ety is this?

 

Private Prisons $$$

private prisons, cca, prison profiteering

Pri­vate Prison Cor­po­ra­tions, such as Cor­rec­tions Cor­po­ra­tion of Amer­i­ca (CCA) and the GEO Group, are in the busi­ness of mak­ing mon­ey. One of the ways they do this is to make sure their pris­ons are filled to the max since they are paid per pris­on­er. Immi­grants, minor offend­ers, the aged, peo­ple up for parole are kept locked up. These com­pa­nies insert a “lock-up quo­ta” into con­tracts to ensure states keep their prison 80–100% filled. They work to ensure leg­is­la­tion that will bring more peo­ple into the sys­tem, and fight against alter­na­tives to jail time by hir­ing dozens of lob­by­ists to act on their behalf. Some­thing is not right here.

Support Not Punishment

SupportNotPunishment

There has been a stag­ger­ing increase in the num­bers of women in prison in the last few decades, large­ly due to the “War on Drugs”  Many of these women began their jour­ney as bat­tered women seek­ing solace in an envi­ron­ment devoid of sup­port ser­vices. They turned to drugs or alco­hol to numb pain and then to pet­ty crimes to pay for the numb­ing. Do they real­ly need prison? Or do we need stronger economies, com­mu­ni­ties and sup­port­ive social institutions?