Connect the Dots

private property, poverty, class, injustice, economyDo you know what I mean about prop­er­ty here? Not my house, my car, or even my small busi­ness I’m doing the best I can kind of prop­er­ty. I’m talk­ing about that gigun­da, grab­bing up all liv­ing space, air, water, seed, bones, mega-fac­to­ry, cor­po­rate sprawl­ing pur­vey­or of mis­ery we call cap­i­tal­ism. That kind of prop­er­ty. It sucks to feed itself. Life. Pos­si­bil­i­ty. Out of most of us. Makes us unrec­og­niz­able to each oth­er. My class. Your class. Yes, it sucks. But for every action, there is a reac­tion. That’s physics. So, what do we do?

Humanity in Motion

refugees, immigrants, displaced persons, survival

Accord­ing to UN fig­ures, there were 19.5 mil­lion refugees world­wide at the end of 2014. The num­ber of peo­ple inter­nal­ly dis­placed by per­se­cu­tion, war or con­flict reached a record num­ber of near­ly 60 mil­lion peo­ple. Then we have all the num­bers who scram­ble from place to place because of their eco­nom­ic con­di­tions. We move to sur­vive, not to cause trou­ble or dis­com­fort for oth­er people.

Which Way Justice

Which Way Justice

Take 2 min­utes, Google “eco­nom­ic jus­tice info-graph­ics,” and we can find plen­ty of stag­ger­ing infor­ma­tion on eco­nom­ic inequal­i­ty. Check out Rick Wolff, lis­ten to his very acces­si­ble lec­tures or read his work for indis­pens­able the­o­ry and knowl­edge to turn around our eco­nom­ic real­i­ty. Not only is eco­nom­ic injus­tice dev­as­tat­ing for us in the U.S., it’s our num­ber one export.

Choose Your Long Haul

LongHaulChoseWeb

But­ter­flies grace us with their pres­ence as they alight quick­ly, ten­ta­tive­ly on blades of grass, a quick kiss on their long dis­tance jour­neys.  We watch, trans­fixed and delight­ed. They make our days a lit­tle more spe­cial, beau­ti­ful.  And, yet, they are dying in stag­ger­ing num­bers, vic­tim to an econ­o­my which digs up, paves over, pol­lutes and just gen­er­al­ly mess­es up the frag­ile paths our winged friends trav­el. Do we real­ly need this kind of econ­o­my, rep­re­sent­ed here by our mechan­i­cal, more destruc­tive long haulers?